Approach

As reporters go about their job, they’ll be able to make decisions about how to approach problems. Depending on their approach, the likelihoods of success or trouble changes.

The Rule

What is it

Approach is a decision players make before Rolling Dice. It determines how likely they are to succeed at something, along with how much danger they’re putting themselves in.

When to use it

Any time a die roll represents the outcome of something the reporter does, players may make a decision about their approach.

The way reporters approach things determines how many dice you roll, and how the result is calculated.

When not to use it

When you do one of these things, do not use an approach:

  • Rolling the dice to pick items on a list
  • Rolling for things that happen TO the reporter, instead of things they do.

How it’s done

There are three approaches: Cautious, Steady, and Reckless.

  • A Cautious approach is more likely to stall or fail, but much less likely to result in Risk.
  • A Steady approach is equally likely to stall or succeed, and carries an average chance of Risk.
  • A Reckless approach is very likely to succeed, but is also very likely to gain Risk.

A steady roll is the default, and is signaled by rolling only one die.

A cautious or reckless roll involves two dice; if you’re rolling like this, state your approach before throwing the dice.

Basic rule: Result

The most basic rule for rolling dice is this:

  • A result of 1-3 is a stall or failure.
  • A result of 4-6 is a success.

A cautious approach means picking the lower of two dice. A reckless approach means picking the higher of two dice. A steady approach means only rolling one die.

Basic rule: Risk

Risk is accrued any time you roll doubles. If you’re not being cautious, it is also accrued when you roll one or six.

In Play

How it looks

Being steady

The default is to assume you’re making a steady approach, so no special consideration is made. Just roll one die.

  • I treat this like any other interview, a little small talk, then the questions.
  • Okay, make your roll.

Being cautious

  • I’m going to carefully make my way around the building, trying to avoid observation.
  • Sounds like a cautious approach! Roll two dice.

Being reckless

  • I’m going to keep asking people about him until I track this gangster guy down!
  • Is that being reckless?
  • Yea, I guess so. I’m going to seek out some scary looking people and ask them if they know him.
  • Okay, roll two dice.

Roll results

Steady approach

A steady approach is the simplest. You roll one die and read the result. Because steady rolls involve only one die, it’s impossible for you to roll doubles— and thus the only way to gain risk is to roll a one or a six.

With one die, all outcomes are equally likely:

  • On a one, you are stalled and gain Risk.
  • On a two or three, you are stalled but do not gain risk.
  • On a four or five, you succeed without risks.
  • On a six, you succeed, but doing so has led to Risk.

Cautious approach

A cautious approach can be made when you want to stay out of trouble. You roll two dice and pick the lowest. You only gain risk when rolling doubles.

With a cautious approach, you’ll be stalled more often:

  • Pick the lowest die. On a one to three, you are stalled. No risk.
  • Pick the lowest die. On a four to six, you succeed. No risk.
  • Any time you roll doubles, you gain Risk.

Reckless approach

A reckless approach is risky, but often leads to success. You roll two dice and pick the highest. You gain risk when rolling doubles or on a one or a six.

With a reckless approach, you’ll succeed more often:

  • On a one, you are stalled and gain Risk.
  • On a two or three, you are stalled but do not gain risk.
  • On a four or five, you succeed without risks.
  • On a six, you succeed, but doing so has led to Risk.
  • Any time you roll doubles, you gain Risk.

Updated: