Info Sheets

Reporters are defined by who and what they know; as players, this information resides in your info sheets.

Explanation

What is it

Info sheets are a pair of handouts given to players to represent the place they live and the focus of their reporting.

Holding an info sheet makes your reporter an expert on a topic. It also means that, as a player, you are an authority on that thing; when questions about it come up, it’s your voice which carries the final say.

Each sheet contains a number of [Details] about the topic they cover. These details provide the flavor and feel of a topic to the player, and are used collaboratively to generate interesting characters when players [Find a Source].

When to use it

When players [Find a Source], they use info sheets and collaborate to create a character. They may also reference the sheets when seeking direction about playing a supporting role.

How it’s done

In Play

How it looks

Being steady

The default is to assume you’re making a steady approach, so no special consideration is made. Just roll one die.

  • I treat this like any other interview, a little small talk, then the questions.
  • Okay, make your roll.

Being cautious

  • I’m going to carefully make my way around the building, trying to avoid observation.
  • Sounds like a cautious approach! Roll two dice.

Being reckless

  • I’m going to keep asking people about him until I track this gangster guy down!
  • Is that being reckless?
  • Yea, I guess so. I’m going to seek out some scary looking people and ask them if they know him.
  • Okay, roll two dice.

Roll results

Steady approach

A steady approach is the simplest. You roll one die and read the result. Because steady rolls involve only one die, it’s impossible for you to roll doubles— and thus the only way to gain risk is to roll a one or a six.

With one die, all outcomes are equally likely:

  • On a one, you are stalled and gain [Risk].
  • On a two or three, you are stalled but do not gain risk.
  • On a four or five, you succeed without risks.
  • On a six, you succeed, but doing so has led to [Risk].

Cautious approach

A cautious approach can be made when you want to stay out of trouble. You roll two dice and pick the lowest. You only gain risk when rolling doubles.

With a cautious approach, you’ll be stalled more often:

  • Pick the lowest die. On a one to three, you are stalled. No risk.
  • Pick the lowest die. On a four to six, you succeed. No risk.
  • Any time you roll doubles, you gain [Risk].

Reckless approach

A reckless approach is risky, but often leads to success. You roll two dice and pick the highest. You gain risk when rolling doubles or on a one or a six.

With a reckless approach, you’ll succeed more often:

  • On a one, you are stalled and gain [Risk].
  • On a two or three, you are stalled but do not gain risk.
  • On a four or five, you succeed without risks.
  • On a six, you succeed, but doing so has led to [Risk].
  • Any time you roll doubles, you gain [Risk].

Samples

example info sheets

Sample info sheets, including a [Beat] and a [Home], can be downloaded here.

Updated: